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Thread: Best practice in calibrating the 2016 salinity probe

  1. #51
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    Guys, I think I got it. But hard to be confident at this point. And my readings are low based on the probe! Which was a previous concern based on my refractometer. Which is why I got into recalibrating to begin with. Can I remove the probe and stick it back in calibration fluid? Can it be in the air for any length of time and still be calibrated? If I remove it from the tank and place it in calibration fluid that I've acclimated to the tank it should be 35ppt. If I can do that, it would go a long way for my confidence. Guidance?
    Current Tank Info: Red Sea Reefer XL 425: 88gl Display, 24gl sump, Kessil AP700 Light, Varios 6 Return Pump, Reef Octopus Regal 150ENT Skimmer, Apex controller with 2 Wav Powerheads, BRS Dosing System for Cal and Alk, BRS Single Media Reactor

  2. #52
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    It does tend to drift a bit if it's been out of the water more than a day before calibration. Usually not more than 0.5 port, but it does impact it to a degree.

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  3. #53
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    I left my TEmp Control setting at zero. Is that correct?

  4. #54
    Frequent Contributor zombie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RussC View Post
    I left my TEmp Control setting at zero. Is that correct?
    No. You want roughly 2.2. The actual amount may vary slightly in the range of 1.9 to 2.4 depending on the type of salt you use if you keep it at 35ppt. It shouldn't make a difference on the reading after calibration if it was done between 76 and 78F and won't make a huge difference even up to 80 (it may change your reading like 0.2 ppt). The way to determine the exact value is to watch how to cond value reacts to changes in tank temp. If cond rises as temp rises, you need to increase the number 0.1 and if cond falls as temp rises, you need to decrease by 0.1. Most tanks will fall at 2.2 though.

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  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by zombie View Post
    No. You want roughly 2.2. The actual amount may vary slightly in the range of 1.9 to 2.4 depending on the type of salt you use if you keep it at 35ppt. It shouldn't make a difference on the reading after calibration if it was done between 76 and 78F and won't make a huge difference even up to 80 (it may change your reading like 0.2 ppt). The way to determine the exact value is to watch how to cond value reacts to changes in tank temp. If cond rises as temp rises, you need to increase the number 0.1 and if cond falls as temp rises, you need to decrease by 0.1. Most tanks will fall at 2.2 though.

    You might be an engineer if...You have no life and can prove it mathematically.
    Can compensation done after calibration? If possible, where do I do this in Apex Fusion? Is it at Inputs>PH probe>pH Probe Configuration>Advance?
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  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2mk View Post
    Can compensation done after calibration? If possible, where do I do this in Apex Fusion? Is it at Inputs>PH probe>pH Probe Configuration>Advance?
    Yes and because you have the 2016 model, yes to the second question.
    Chad

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by iamchadster View Post
    Yes and because you have the 2016 model, yes to the second question.
    Somehow there seem to be no place to put compassion value? Is it because it was not originally calibrated manually?
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  8. #58
    NSI Member iamchadster's Avatar
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    No, are you in the inputs screen? In the inputs screen under the Type heading find "Base_Cond". Click into that and select the advanced tab to find the compensation factor.
    Chad

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by iamchadster View Post
    No, are you in the inputs screen? In the inputs screen under the Type heading find "Base_Cond". Click into that and select the advanced tab to find the compensation factor.
    Thanks. I was at the wrong screen. Went to the correct screen you told me, adjusted TC to 2.2, and readings have less swings, but it took the ppt readings higher. Have now adjusted TC to 1.1 and it came a bit down but still higher ppt than when TC was 0.0. Will obsere and see what happens over the next few hours.

    Does the probe needs to be re-calibrated if I decide to take TC back to 0.0? Salt reading was a lot stabler before.
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  10. #60
    Frequent Contributor zombie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2mk View Post
    Thanks. I was at the wrong screen. Went to the correct screen you told me, adjusted TC to 2.2, and readings have less swings, but it took the ppt readings higher. Have now adjusted TC to 1.1 and it came a bit down but still higher ppt than when TC was 0.0. Will obsere and see what happens over the next few hours.

    Does the probe needs to be re-calibrated if I decide to take TC back to 0.0? Salt reading was a lot stabler before.
    Use a TC that is stable not what gives you the value you want. If your tank temp is close to 77F, the error will be minimal and recalibration is not necessary. If you keep your tank at 79 or above you might consider recalibrating.

    You might be an engineer if...You have no life and can prove it mathematically.

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by zombie View Post
    Use a TC that is stable not what gives you the value you want. If your tank temp is close to 77F, the error will be minimal and recalibration is not necessary. If you keep your tank at 79 or above you might consider recalibrating.

    You might be an engineer if...You have no life and can prove it mathematically.
    Calibrated the probe for a week now and it seems stable but creeping up. Surprisingly, readings dropped below 37 after my water change on saturday night, has been increasing since.

    I was just wondering if TC can fix the slowly rising problem. It turns out it doesn't. I have now set TC back to 0.0 and see waht will happen. Hopefully I don't have to recalibrate. Please see chart below. 12-18-17.jpg
    I recalibrat
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  12. #62
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    The slowly rising thing is either new probe break in (took 4 days for mine) or bubble accumulation (I use a magnetic probe rack at a 10 degree angle and in a section with minimal bubbles to prevent this). Temp compensation is solely used to smooth changes due to temp. I consider stable for that oscillations of no more than +- 0.2 ppt per degree F change.

    You might be an engineer if...You have no life and can prove it mathematically.

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by zombie View Post
    The slowly rising thing is either new probe break in (took 4 days for mine) or bubble accumulation (I use a magnetic probe rack at a 10 degree angle and in a section with minimal bubbles to prevent this). Temp compensation is solely used to smooth changes due to temp. I consider stable for that oscillations of no more than +- 0.2 ppt per degree F change.

    You might be an engineer if...You have no life and can prove it mathematically.

    Thanks. I will recalibrate it again keeping all of the points you mentioned concerning Temperature, Temp Comp, interferecnes, and etc. So far the fluctuations are still higher that +-0.2 ppt per F degree.
    When You're a NOOB, You need lots of help all the time

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