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Thread: Cor 20 One inch Plumbing

  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by fishstix View Post
    Did anyone find the Unions that would work? I am in need of 2 of them. At this point if they are 50 dollars, I don't care, just need to get my pumps up, but I have not been able to find them.
    In that case... https://www.neptunesystems.com/produ...cement-unions/

  2. #27
    Master Control Freak RussM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Member No 1 View Post
    This link is for flow sensor coupling & unions, not COR fittings.
    I'm not a Neptune support rep. Please do not send me PMs with technical questions or requesting assistance - use the forums for Apex help. PM me ONLY if the matter is of a private or personal nature. Thanks.

  3. #28
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    Yep those are for the flow sensors, so basically I have two paper weights until I can find the unions :-(

  4. #29
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    Since they aren't of any use now, this might be worth a shot...
    https://www.google.com/search?q=how+...hrome&ie=UTF-8

  5. #30
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    I don't know if you're using them as external or submerged pumps, but something like this may work:

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Fernco-1...-125/100055392

    Also, if you are using it as a submerged pump, a standard 1 ¼" FPT fitting will screw on, it just won't be completely water tight. If there's a tiny bit of leakage with a submerged pump, it won't matter, since it just recirculates back into the return chamber of the sump.

    Threaded electrical conduit generally has parallel threads - I've been meaning to see if I can find a 1 ¼" electrical conduit fitting to see how it fits. EDIT: PVC conduit, not metallic.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sleepydoc View Post

    Threaded electrical conduit generally has parallel threads - I've been meaning to see if I can find a 1 ¼" electrical conduit fitting to see how it fits.
    Bad idea. Unless it PVC conduit, it will leach toxic metals in the tank.

    You might be an engineer if...You have no life and can prove it mathematically.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by zombie View Post
    Bad idea. Unless it PVC conduit, it will leach toxic metals in the tank.
    Yes, PVC electrical conduit.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Member No 1 View Post
    Since they aren't of any use now, this might be worth a shot...
    https://www.google.com/search?q=how+...hrome&ie=UTF-8
    I tried this one and it work great
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HuWuxVfHJ6o

    The ones from (my) Home Depot (Just the slip side) will work if you sand down outside of the ring just a little bit to fit in the nut. Then use the threaded side and the nut that came with the COR or the Flow sensor.

  9. #34
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    Can someone please confirm that the intake is 1-1/2 BSPP with 11 threads/inch? I want to verify the threads 100% before ordering an expensive tap.

  10. #35
    IT Reefer TheNore's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Member No 1 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by RussM View Post
    This link is for flow sensor coupling & unions, not COR fittings.

    You are both correct, I need a replacement COR Union. So I reached out to neptune support and they had to create a custom ticket for me.
    I was given instructions to reference the ticket when ordering a "FS-100 Union" with shipping it came to $25

    The whole process took 48 hours, but the union is now shipping to me.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gotfrogs View Post
    Can someone please confirm that the intake is 1-1/2 BSPP with 11 threads/inch? I want to verify the threads 100% before ordering an expensive tap.
    From Page 5 of the COR 20 Stand-alone User Guide, the intake of the COR 20 is 1 ½" BSPP and the outlet is 1 ¼" BSPP. I'm not aware of more than one thread density standard for BSPP fittings, but I presume you have the pump, so you should be able to measure and count the threads on your pump.

    If just need to replace the fittings that Neptune shipped with the COR, checkout this thread/post. I have never tried/used any of the ideas listed there, simply read about them in various forums, but it's worth a shot before doing something more expensive.

  12. #37
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    So just an update on this - I went to Lowes and found some 1 ¼" and 1 ½" PVC female adapters for PVC electrical conduit. The 1 ¼" adapter fit nicely on the outlet of my COR 20 but I couldn't get the 1 ½" adapter to screw on more than a turn or so. I haven't looked at the thread specs, but there must be enough of a difference in either the diameter or pitch between 1 ½" BSPP and FPT fittings so they don't work.

  13. #38
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    Some clarification, somewhat simplified.

    NPT = National Pipe Taper - This is the common fitting used in the USA.
    The treads are cut on a taper so as you screw a male into a female the threads form a
    friction fit which provides a seal.

    BSPP = British Standard Pipe Parallel - As the name states, the treads are formed parallel (no taper),
    and because of them being parallel, they do not provide any sort of sealing. To seal this type of treaded
    connection, you would either need a machined surface on the inside bottom of the female fitting that a mating
    angle on the male fitting would seal against, or as in the case of the COR an O-ring seal.

    Besides the above differences, one major difference, and this is why a NPT fitting will not thread onto
    a BSPP fitting more than a turn or two, is that NPT threads are cut with a 60 degree included thread angle,
    where as the BSPP thread is cut with a 55 degrees included thread angle.

    So bottom line is.... a NPT fitting will not work with a BSPP thread.

  14. #39
    VP Sales and Marketing Terence's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Member No 1 View Post
    Some clarification, somewhat simplified.

    NPT = National Pipe Taper - This is the common fitting used in the USA.
    The treads are cut on a taper so as you screw a male into a female the threads form a
    friction fit which provides a seal.

    BSPP = British Standard Pipe Parallel - As the name states, the treads are formed parallel (no taper),
    and because of them being parallel, they do not provide any sort of sealing. To seal this type of treaded
    connection, you would either need a machined surface on the inside bottom of the female fitting that a mating
    angle on the male fitting would seal against, or as in the case of the COR an O-ring seal.

    Besides the above differences, one major difference, and this is why a NPT fitting will not thread onto
    a BSPP fitting more than a turn or two, is that NPT threads are cut with a 60 degree included thread angle,
    where as the BSPP thread is cut with a 55 degrees included thread angle.

    So bottom line is.... a NPT fitting will not work with a BSPP thread.
    Very good explanation!

    The only refinement I might make would be to say: "a NPT fitting will not work CORRECTLY with a BSPP thread" only because so many people are using pumps like the M1 and L1 with NPT fittings by using gobs of teflon tape and cranking down them down. Horrible idea, but I have seen more than one well known industry professional person doing this!
    Terence Fugazzi :: VP Sales and Marketing :: Neptune Systems

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by wwanthony View Post
    FYI. I just heard back from BRS and the Vectra adapters are BSPP (non tapered).

    So I'm confused will it work?

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by marksw View Post
    So I'm confused will it work?
    Unfortunately, It did not work and it is BSPP (I confirmed it on a different component). Barely a full turn or so. Strange. The NPT version from Home Depot fits better and works fine if you are using the COR in you sump.

  17. #42
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    i ditched the union provided from neptune and used a thread x slip adapter "npt x slip"

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgarcia View Post
    i ditched the union provided from neptune and used a thread x slip adapter "npt x slip"
    I have done the same.

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terence View Post
    You will not find it on Amazon, and as I said, it is about a $50 part. Changing out a pump is usually never a drop-in experience. There are exceptions - the COR is a drop-in replacement for Vectra M1 and Deepwater DC-8. It was designed that way intentionally. Most people that want to hot-swap pumps almost always do so with an identical back up pump. Making an adapter link up with a union is the best option for your situation.
    So Terence people are stating that the Vectra adapters which are BSPP does not work! Why not then if the Cor was meant to be a direct replacement

  20. #45
    VP Sales and Marketing Terence's Avatar
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    I cannot speak for those adapters but the threads are identical.
    Terence Fugazzi :: VP Sales and Marketing :: Neptune Systems

  21. #46
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    I initially hooked my COR-20 to my existing 3/4" plumbing. I then adjusted the flow on the pump, without changing any other settings such as the valve on my return drain, to match the flow of the RIO pump I replaced. The resulting COR-20 speed was 65%. I ran this for almost a week and then had time to re-plumb everything with 1 1/4" pipe and fittings, adding a backflow valve as well. I had to lower the COR-20 to 45% to keep from overflowing my tank. I opened up the return drain valve a bit and set the COR-20 to 55%. I couldn't go any higher since that is the most my overflow can handle. I am impressed by the flow improvements achieved by increasing the pipe dimension. I calculated the cost savings compared to the old RIO pump running on 3/4" pipe and expect to see ~$80/year in savings.

    It was difficult to fit the larger plumbing under my 90-gallon tank but well worth the effort!
    Last edited by wasmithee; 04-03-2018 at 18:01. Reason: spelling error

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by wasmithee View Post
    I initially hooked my COR-20 to my existing 3/4" plumbing. I then adjusted the flow on the pump, without changing any other settings such as the valve on my return drain, to match the flow of the RIO pump I replaced. The resulting COR-20 speed was 65%. I ran this for almost a week and then had time to re-plumb everything with 1 1/4" pipe and fittings, adding a backflow valve as well. I had to lower the COR-20 to 45% to keep from overflowing my tank. I opened up the return drain valve a bit and set the COR-20 to 55%. I couldn't go any higher since that is the most my overflow can handle. I am impressed by the flow improvements achieved by increasing the pipe dimension. I calculated the cost savings compared to the old RIO pump running on 3/4" pipe and expect to see ~$80/year in savings.

    It was difficult to fit the larger plumbing under my 90-gallon tank but well worth the effort!
    Lucky you. I was trying to achieve 800gph for my 80g. Display was only getting 620 and the Refugium 180gph. And this was at 100%. This is a 500$ mistake. Definitely go as big as you can from the start. And not make my mistake.
    I’m now going 1 1/4 formonly a few inches. Then everything is 1 1/2 with 1” branches
    With the right space I had to ditch the provided union. And use a adapter. But that’s ok cause check valves are union

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