Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Apex disconnecting from fusion

  1. #1
    Regular Vistor
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    US, Central time
    Posts
    22

    Apex disconnecting from fusion

    Hello, we moved last week and I just finally got my apex set up. I connected easily but keep losing fusion. Heartbeat says I have disconnected 132 times in the past 24 hours. I somehow didn't know this. I must not have had heartbeat enabled or something. It was working fine with the old wifi. The new wifi is 2 bandwidth, previously it was one. It seems ok on ethernet.

    Any suggestions out there?

    TIA,
    Cindy



    Sent from my SM-G935T using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Frequent Contributor zombie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    11,278
    Try changing your wifi channel. There are apps such as wifi analyzer that will show you the congestion of the 2.4GHz (what the apex uses). Some routers aren't great at optimizing channel selection, so if it gives you a bad one, change it to whichever is the best of 1, 6, or 11 (only use these three. All other channels overlap and it will make things worse even if the analyzer recommends them).

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk

  3. #3
    Regular Vistor
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    US, Central time
    Posts
    22
    Quote Originally Posted by zombie View Post
    Try changing your wifi channel. There are apps such as wifi analyzer that will show you the congestion of the 2.4GHz (what the apex uses). Some routers aren't great at optimizing channel selection, so if it gives you a bad one, change it to whichever is the best of 1, 6, or 11 (only use these three. All other channels overlap and it will make things worse even if the analyzer recommends them).

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
    I'll try that thanks!

    Sent from my SM-G935T using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    NSI Member rkpetersen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    635
    If zombie's suggestion doesn't work, some other things you can try:

    1. From the Apex dash Network Page, disable DHCP and set your system to a static IP address outside of the DHCP range (as determined by your router) and reboot.
    2. From the Apex dash Network Page, add 8.8.8.8 as DNS2 and reboot.
    3. Put your Apex system on a UPS to provide clean steady power.

  5. #5
    Regular Vistor
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    US, Central time
    Posts
    22
    Quote Originally Posted by rkpetersen View Post
    If zombie's suggestion doesn't work, some other things you can try:

    1. From the Apex dash Network Page, disable DHCP and set your system to a static IP address outside of the DHCP range (as determined by your router) and reboot.
    2. From the Apex dash Network Page, add 8.8.8.8 as DNS2 and reboot.
    3. Put your Apex system on a UPS to provide clean steady power.
    Hi! Thank you for the suggestions. I'm afraid I got as far as "disable DHCP and set your system to a static IP" before I was completely lost. I googled DHCP so I have a vague understanding but the rest is beyond my knowledge. If you have time would you explain? No doubt it would be useful!

    Sent from my SM-G935T using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    NSI Member rkpetersen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    635
    DHCP is the way your router assigns an IP address on your local home network to all the devices. The addresses might be something like 192.168.1.xxx, with the last part variable. Each device talks to the router, asks for an IP address, and the router decides what xxx will be for each connected device, from a range of numbers that it's programmed to dish out. So your Apex could be on 192.168.1.15, for example, if that's what your router gave it.

    This system usually works fine but sometimes problems and conflicts can arise, which can prevent devices from accessing the internet properly. A way to sometimes fix this is to have the device tell the router what number it wants, rather than asking. This is a static IP address; it's always the same. When you set a static IP address, it best to set the xxx fairly high, like 111, as this number is unlikely to be used in the DHCP table. (Ideally, you should restrict the DHCP range in the router to not include this number, but that's generally not necessary.)

    So basically, if you've got DHCP enabled and a current IP of 192.168.1.5 (for example), you could disable DHCP, manually set the IP to 192.168.1.111 (for example), and reboot to have a static IP address.

  7. #7
    Regular Vistor
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    US, Central time
    Posts
    22
    Quote Originally Posted by rkpetersen View Post
    DHCP is the way your router assigns an IP address on your local home network to all the devices. The addresses might be something like 192.168.1.xxx, with the last part variable. Each device talks to the router, asks for an IP address, and the router decides what xxx will be for each connected device, from a range of numbers that it's programmed to dish out. So your Apex could be on 192.168.1.15, for example, if that's what your router gave it.

    This system usually works fine but sometimes problems and conflicts can arise, which can prevent devices from accessing the internet properly. A way to sometimes fix this is to have the device tell the router what number it wants, rather than asking. This is a static IP address; it's always the same. When you set a static IP address, it best to set the xxx fairly high, like 111, as this number is unlikely to be used in the DHCP table. (Ideally, you should restrict the DHCP range in the router to not include this number, but that's generally not necessary.)

    So basically, if you've got DHCP enabled and a current IP of 192.168.1.5 (for example), you could disable DHCP, manually set the IP to 192.168.1.111 (for example), and reboot to have a static IP address.
    That's extremely helpful thank you! Dumb question though, at the end you say"reboot to have a static ip" reboot the router or the apex?

    Sent from my SM-G935T using Tapatalk

  8. #8
    Hydroponics Guy
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    58
    First, re-boot the router. Then re-boot the Apex and make sure it grabs the right address (the one you set). Just make sure you only change the last octet (xxx). If you mess with the first, second, or third octet or if you change the subnet mask (for typical homes, it should be 255.255.255.0), you will have issues. The default range for a class C IP address (which is what you have), is 192.168.0.1 - 192.168.0.254, you can't use 255, it's reserved for something else (that's another whole discussion).

  9. #9
    Regular Vistor
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    US, Central time
    Posts
    22
    Quote Originally Posted by Sanderson234 View Post
    First, re-boot the router. Then re-boot the Apex and make sure it grabs the right address (the one you set). Just make sure you only change the last octet (xxx). If you mess with the first, second, or third octet or if you change the subnet mask (for typical homes, it should be 255.255.255.0), you will have issues. The default range for a class C IP address (which is what you have), is 192.168.0.1 - 192.168.0.254, you can't use 255, it's reserved for something else (that's another whole discussion).


    Sent from my SM-G935T using Tapatalk

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •